Top 10 world's most hated airports

0 Comment(s)Print E-mail CNNGo.com, November 21, 2011
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There's a special form of loathing reserved for a building that forces you to remove your shoes, wait in line, get groped, shell out for bad food and dash in a panic to an arbitrarily changed gate before canceling your flight.

But let's be clear. The most hated airports in the world are not the worst airports in the world.

For that you'll have to consult Lonely Planet or fly to destinations the majority of us have little need to pin on a map or pronounce properly.

To come up with our admittedly unscientific list, we canvassed travel websites, blogs and message boards. And called on memories of our own travel nightmares.

What follow are 10 majorly despised international hubs (or hopefuls) that, while they may have a few staunch fans, and some have even won awards, have all inspired enough fury, flak and "never again" air-rage to merit a place on this list.

   São Paulo-Guarulhos International, São Paulo, Brazil

 

São Paulo-Guarulhos International, São Paulo in Brazil

Whether it's 9 a.m. or 9 p.m. this airport experiences round-the-clock rush hour.[CNNGo.com]



 Why is this place on our list after scoring third best airport in South America at the 2011 World Airport Awards?

Because, shockingly enough, it turns out that corporate medal ceremonies aren't always in sync with what people are thinking when they're standing in two-hour immigration lines, suffering routinely unannounced gate changes and paying through the teeth for a stale Brazilian cheese roll and beer inside an understaffed and over-aged aviation facility.

In a country where flight delays (departing or arriving) are just part of the deal, some recent numbers would give pause to the most unflappable traveler at Brazil's largest airport.

Just 41 percent of all flights leave on time. Only 59 percent of flights arrive on schedule, according to Forbes.

São Paulo-Guarulhos has announced plans to add runways and terminals -- what airport hasn't? -- but with nearly 30 million passengers traipsing through every year (the figure has reportedly doubled in under a decade) the urgency is palpable and, sadly enough, unsolved by upping prices at musty duty-free shops.

But does this really constitute bronze medal status? When the best unofficial advice for surviving Brazil's pin-up airport is to try and learn a little Portuguese and not lose your temper, something's gotta give.

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